Adjusting and Caring For New Dentures

Dental model and dental equipment on a dental tableGood dental hygiene is an important practice for anyone; more so, if they just got dentures. Dentures increase the risk of developing serious conditions, such as periodontal disease, leukoplakia, and fungal infections. Your new smile may cost more than a few dollars if you are not careful with what you do after getting it.

Here are a few care tips that will help you maintain a beautiful smile:

Brush regularly

Be sure to brush the palate, tongue, and gums every evening after removing the dentures and every day before wearing them. Use a brush with soft bristles. Brushing your gums and palate helps remove accumulated plaque. After removing the dentures at night, brush them to remove loose debris and plaque, and then soak them in a cleansing solution.

Many dentures in South Bend, Indiana come with a cleansing solution that is recommended by the dentist. Clean your dentures with water or a towel to avoid breakage.

See your dentist 24 hours later

After having new dentures, it is not uncommon to be uncomfortable. Your dentist may recommend or make minor adjustments to increase comfort before the problems escalate. Naturally, a new denture will feel unusual in the mouth. The tongue, cheeks, and lips will also require adjustment time. You can expect to bite yourself in the first hours but persistent soreness should be reported to your dentist. Sometimes, dentists also recommend adhesives.

Practice

At first, chewing food will feel ridiculous. As a rule of thumb, begin by chewing on small amounts of soft food. Use both sides of the mouth. You can increase the amount of food you chew as you get used to the new dentures. Speaking will also require some time to adjust. Some words may be difficult to pronounce, but you should be good within two weeks.

With the excitement of getting new dentures, it can be easy to overlook proper care. The temptation is to rush flashing that smile, but you need to be careful. You may have to relearn things that are almost natural, such as eating; but bothersome as it may sound, it is all worth it.